The Best Path to a Career in Data Science

Blog header image "best path to a career in data science"

In our blog, “The Best Path To A Career In Software Development,” we looked at how bootcamps provide a more direct path to a career than traditional undergraduate CS degree programs. Today we’re here to talk to you about how bootcamps provide a more direct path to a career in data science than a Master’s Degree. 

“But don’t I need a degree to get a job as a data scientist?” As a non-traditional educational model, we hear this concern a lot. The answer is yes and no. Yes, because most jobs in data science require some form of higher education. No, because that degree doesn’t have to be in something related to data science – data scientists have degrees in many different areas of study! So if the concern that lacking a piece of paper will prevent you from accelerating your career, fear no more.

While a Master’s Degree provides a lot of value, it isn’t the most direct path for a job. With the exponential growth in data generation and the race to keep up with storing and processing that data, data science no longer sits at the fringe of an ultra-specialized workforce. Companies now need much larger teams to analyze, model, and leverage the data they’ve collected. So while the field of data science might have once only been available to those skilled in highly academic algorithm development, it’s now a playground for those with some Python skills who know how to find valuable insights in a mess of data. 

 

Now let’s get a bit more specific. If modern roles in data science demand more practical skills, why is a bootcamp a better path?

 

#1: Responsive curriculum: Barely 10 years ago nobody had heard of data science. But in that short amount of time, the tools and technologies in the field have grown exponentially. Each year sees the introduction of new packages, visualization tools, and cutting edge technologies. With such a rapidly evolving landscape, it’s hard for traditional learning environments to keep pace. With our ears tuned directly to employers, we’re able to adapt quickly and ensure we’re teaching what hiring managers need.

 

#2 Hands-on Project-Based Learning: Have you ever watched Top Chef or The Great British Bake Off? You were probably pretty entertained, but how did that seared Ahi Tuna with orange mint avocado salsa and balsamic vinegar reduced amuse-bouche turn out? The sad reality is, watching experts do their thing doesn’t make you an expert. Nor does listening to lectures. Our program is built around the concept of praxis, which is essentially the practical application of theory, or the blending of theory and practice. Half of your 670 program hours are spent actually writing code, so you develop the muscle memory and experience of programming. A career in data science is like an old-time trade, like becoming a blacksmith: you have to learn from masters and practice, practice, practice. 

 

#3 Progressive Curriculum Structure: In a traditional degree, students study by taking several classes at a time. You may begin with data structures and algorithms, then move to SQL, then take Python, and so on. But real-world data science doesn’t work so neatly. You will never face a project where you’re only working with one of those tools, so this pedagogical method is misaligned with career demands. Our program focuses on real-world deliverables at every step of the journey, while exposing you to increasingly complex problems and projects. You start off applying basic tools to simple challenges. Then, we begin varying the data sets, the way you access that data, the type of methodology you use, and the deliverable you’re responsible for. To put it simply, the structure of a traditional degree teaches you how to use a hammer, a saw, and a chisel. Codeup teaches you how to build a stool, a birdbox, and a sculpture with those tools, and when to use which. 

 

#4 Job Placement Services: If education is your goal, stop reading now. If a career is your goal, then you’re in the right place. Most graduate institutions have career service offices where you can get advice on your resume and attend job fairs. But Codeup makes you a promise: get a job after graduation or get 100% of your money back. There are no two ways about that: our singular focus is your outcome. Unlike traditional institutions, we sell jobs, not education. 

 

#5 Messy Data: This is probably the most important difference between us and traditional degrees. We use real, messy, misleading, broken data so you learn how to draw insights from the real thing. Unfortunately, that is not the norm. Because of the segmented class structure, traditional degrees have to focus on using data that teach one specific skill. At Codeup, you’re always applying your tools to a real deliverable, so we’re able to use real data sets that intersect the challenges of multiple skills. 

 

Lastly, we encourage you to think about the return on your investment in your education.

Codeup* Private Master’s
  • $27,500
  • 5 months
  • 85% graduation rate
  • 88%  employment rate
  • $67,500 median starting salary
  • $62,280
  • 18-24 months
  • 61% graduation rate
  • 72.5% employment rate
  • $59,866 median starting salary

*read more on our outcomes

 

Most importantly, the opportunity cost of pursuing a master’s degree is equal to 13-19 months of employment. At a median salary of $67,500 from Codeup, that’s between $67,500-$101,250 in foregone earnings. 

So, you want a career in data science? A career accelerator like Codeup is the path for you. Still not convinced? We’re here to hear your concerns – contact us and let’s talk it through.

Codeup’s COVID-19 Relief Scholarship

covid-19 relief scholarship

Codeup’s mission is to empower life change, and we do that by living four core values: Be Helpful, Cultivate Inclusive Growth, Deliver Excellence, and Act with Integrity. We also operate according to one of San Antonio’s unofficial credos: “Rising tides lift all ships.” With the goal of helping more individuals navigate a career change during this difficult time, Codeup is excited to announce a $2,500 COVID-19 Relief Scholarship for those who have been affected by COVID-19. 

From Day 1, Codeup has placed a value on who we serve. After starting with a Women in Tech Scholarship, we expanded our offerings to include financial support for people of color, LGBTQIA+ individuals, military veterans, and first responders. Now, as many of our friends, family, and neighbors face furloughs or layoffs and our favorite establishments close, we’d like to continue to help.

If you or someone you know is looking for a career change and has been impacted by COVID-19, please check out more information on utilizing our $2,500 COVID-19 Relief scholarship by clicking here.

We’re wishing the best for our fellow San Antonio and Dallas communities. Remember, we’re all in this together. Stay safe and let us know how we can help.

Discovering My Passion Through Codeup

Headshot of WebDevelopment Alumni, Miguel. Beside the title graphic "Discovering my passion through Codeup"

On February 27th, 2020, I completed an intensive career accelerator program to become a Full-Stack Web Developer! It was a great experience that made me feel right at home. Solving problems, planning, and developing projects all aligned perfectly with my passions and hobbies.

 

Out of the 670+ hours spent developing, there were moments when I would feel the stress, frustration, and discouragement when my source code wouldn’t produce my expected outcome. However, I believed in my abilities and persevered. I continued to work diligently on every project until it was successfully complete. The hard work wasn’t easy, but it was extremely rewarding. It is commonly said, “If you love what you do, it won’t feel like work” and I truly what I love to do! I can honestly say that my career is my passion.

 

The impact this program has had on me is unforgettable. I’ve left this program with a new career, knowledge, experience, and skills; but also friends that share the same passion as myself. It was beyond my expectations. I am extremely grateful for the friendships created, the instructors who always had time to help, and the staff that solidified this entire experience. My drive and passion have led me here and I’m eager to embark on this journey to keep learning and continue developing.

 


Are you ready to discover your passion? Then make sure to check out our programs and give us a call, we’d love to help you find the career of your dreams!

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Miguel Garcia is a Software developer in the San Antonio, TX. Connect with him on Linkedin!

Setting Myself Up For Success at Codeup

Blog graphic picturing Codeup Web Development Alumni, next to the title "Setting myself up for success at Codeup"

 

Last year, I knew I needed to make a career change, but I had no idea where to begin. I had fallen into the trap of working mindless jobs only to make ends meet. I was hungry for success and ready to transition from a “job” to a “career,” but I did not know what would get me there. After conducting a lot of research, I came to the conclusion that the tech industry is where I wanted to get started, specifically as a web developer. Unfortunately, when I did a Google search for “coding bootcamp,” I came across about 6,000,000 results. Some programs offered courses online, in-person, or a combination of the two. As for the financial options, programs either offered financial assistance or none at all. I was having a difficult time choosing the best program for me because I was left with so many questions.

 

To find answers to my questions, I decided to schedule calls with the programs I was interested in. After talking to several bootcamps, I was able to narrow down my options. I needed a program located in San Antonio, TX that offered in-person learning and tuition assistance. This was when I knew Codeup was the best possible option for me. I wanted an in-person experience because I needed an environment that would help me find the success I was after. As I did my research on Codeup, it became clear that they were going to provide the best experience for me.

Now that I graduated and am looking back, I know I made the right decision. While I could mention all of the many ways that Codeup changed my life, I want to share some of the benefits for any individuals considering going here. Every day, I was taught by experienced instructors from all types of backgrounds and with various teaching styles. I had an amazing cohort that shared the journey with me and I can confidently say that I have made lifelong friends. I was also surrounded by an amazing network of alumni, staff, employer partners, and the tech community in San Antonio. Everything about Codeup is so much more effective because it is in-person. One of my favorite experiences at Codeup was the career simulation and preparation. I was able to work one-on-one with a professional that is going to help place me in my first web developer position. I feel like none of this success would have been possible if I decided to take an alternate route through an online program or part-time environment

 

Going to school full-time was not an easy task, but here is how I made it possible: 

  • Finances: I saved up enough money to cover my bills while I was in school. I also received a scholarship through Codeup and was awarded a grant through Project QUEST.
  • Time management: I surrounded myself with a team of family and friends that provided me with endless support. They understood that I was going to have late nights and go weeks without seeing them. I planned my days accordingly and always made sure to prioritize school first.
  • Rewards: Throughout my time at Codeup, I found it necessary to give myself little rewards. Whenever I would get through a challenging day or successfully complete a project, I would allow myself a special treat like a Starbucks coffee or a cheap lunch at a restaurant with my cohort. 

 

If you are considering Codeup’s web development program, my advice is that you ask yourself if you are ready to commit to changing your career and ultimately your life in five months. A full-time program is not easy, but the outcome is going to be worth it if you put in hard work. Remember that you are not sacrificing your time, but are instead investing in a better version of you.

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Beverly Jaimes-Puente is a Web Developer in the San Antonio area. Connect with her on Linkedin!

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If you’re ready to find a career you love, we’re happy to help you set yourself up for success too! Give us a call and let’s get started talking about your future, today!

5 Common Excuses Keeping You From Breaking Into the Tech Field

Just a few months before starting at Codeup in the Redwood cohort, I was sitting in the football stadium at the University of Colorado at Boulder, pondering what I would do after graduation. The commencement speaker that year was Kate Fagan, a sports reporter and commentator at ESPN. In her speech, something she said stuck out to me: “Try replacing ‘should’ with ‘want’ and, as frequently as you are able, make decisions with that rubric. Life is best when your ‘should’ and your ‘want’ are aligned.” Sitting there in that stadium, I realized that I knew exactly what I should be doing after graduating, which was applying to attend graduate school for the next five years. But the actual truth was, I didn’t know what I truly wanted. Did I really want to jump into something for five years that I wasn’t completely sure about?

With this in mind I moved to San Antonio after graduation, mostly to be closer to my family. One night at the dinner table, my brother-in-law mentioned several eye-catching billboards around town promoting a local coding bootcamp named Codeup. I had dabbled a bit in coding when I was in college, so my interest was immediately piqued. However, there were doubts nagging at the back of my mind. Am I even capable enough to attend an intensive coding bootcamp like this? I’m not really a super logical person… Am I cut out for this? etc, etc. Despite having a ton of reservations about my capabilities and the usefulness of attending a boot camp, I decided to take a leap of faith. And just a year-and-a-half later, I celebrated my one year as a software developer at Armor in Richardson, TX. In some ways, it feels like a dream. The hard work I put in, the days and nights of impassioned coding, pushing through all the excuses… and finally landing a dream job?! It’s a colorful blur.

So that’s why in this post, I want to address five common excuses that may be keeping you from considering a career in technology. At the end of the day, it doesn’t really make sense to let your fears and nagging doubts keep you from the job of your dreams.

1. “I’m not cut out for a career in tech”

This was one of the primary fears at the forefront of my mind when thinking about doing a complete shift to a technology career. And, as I went through Codeup, I heard this many times from my peers. To be honest, it doesn’t ever fully go away. There are days even now at work where I think I’m in over my head and that I don’t belong there (Imposter Syndrome, anyone?). This fear completely disregards the fact that I’m already doing it. The truth is, it isn’t always easy. Technology is constantly changing, creating new problems and forcing those within the field to continuously find new solutions. At my company, even our most senior developers are learning something new every day. We all have our doubts sometimes, but those self-limiting beliefs shouldn’t keep you from pursuing anything you set your mind to.

2. “I wouldn’t fit in with engineers”

Let me ask you something. What does a veteran, electrical technician, and college music teacher have in common? Well, there was at least one of each in my cohort at Codeup, and all of them excelled and went on to become software developers. Other characters in my cohort included a stay-at-home-mom, barista, marketing professional, and a chef. All of these, however, are just arbitrary labels. None of these people told themselves “I’m just going to be a barista forever, because that’s who I am” or “My personality only suits being in a teacher, so I’m not going to try something different.” The reality is, our self-concept is always constantly shifting. There was such a colorful diversity of backgrounds, personalities, and skill sets at Codeup, proving that there’s no one type or mold of individual that can pursue a technology career.

3. “I don’t want to work alone all day staring at a computer screen”

There are days where indeed this is the case for me, just “heads down coding”, but more often than not my days are filled with collaboration and communication with my teammates. When someone runs into a problem they don’t have the knowledge to solve, they track down someone who does. When a few of us are working in the same codebase, we make sure to frequently communicate to make sure we’re not stepping on each other’s toes. On top of that, we get to be a part of producing the product, providing feedback and suggestions. There are very few days where I just sit at my desk all day, boring holes into my computer screen. Although my experience may certainly be atypical, the main point I’m trying to make is that there is a large range of positions and cultures within the technology field. There are also other roles within the technology field beyond coding and data analytics, such as evangelists and solutions consultants. Both of these have lots of interaction with people and clients! Don’t be afraid to try a few different things until you find your fit.

4. “I don’t have enough experience”

Most of us at Codeup did not come in with prior experience in coding. The great thing about coding bootcamps is that they typically take you from 0 to 100 in a condensed period of time. They guide you through the entire process, allowing you to maximize your success, with everything from technical skills, networking, portfolio-building, and resume review. Even with bootcamps aside, there is a plethora of both paid and free resources online that give you the ability to learn a lot of the preliminary skills you would need. There are communities (e.g. Chingu) with the sole purpose of learning and building projects in new technologies. Experience can be gained, so seek out those resources. They’re only a few keystrokes away.

One thing to note about the technology field is that it’s becoming more and more heavily based on experience and not your formal education. Many companies will see the value in someone who has practical experience. The reality is that many companies are shifting towards seeking out individuals that can come in and hit the ground running with practical know-how instead of purely theoretical education.

5. “I’m not tech savvy enough.”

Although basic computer skills are necessary for success, it’s probably not as much as you think. And like I mentioned above, being able to excel in this field is all about embracing change and learning to learn. You may think you’re not tech savvy because you always have issues with your radio or you can’t get your apps to work right or you get frustrated with your computer software for not doing what you want it to – all of these things are valid struggles. Trust me, I’ve been there. The reality is this: Many of these skills can be learned.


As you look into pursuing a career in the technology field, don’t let these thought patterns keep you from getting where you want to be. Instead, ask yourself the real questions: Why do I want to do this? What kind of lifestyle do I see for myself? What am I passionate about? Excuses are excuses, not truths about you and your life. Set a vision and relentlessly pursue it, letting all these limiting beliefs slide off of you. They don’t have to define your journey.


Joyce Ling is a software developer at a cloud security company based in Richardson, TX. In her free time, she sings in a women’s chorus, rock climbs, plays guitar, and currently runs an organization to bring queer women together in the Dallas/Ft. Worth metroplex. 

Follow her on Instagram @ironicsushi or read more of her work at The Luscious Word.

Everyday Encounters with Data Science

You come home from work, tired to the bone and groaning as you realize you forgot to prep dinner tonight. So, what do you do? You plop down on the couch, whip out your phone and Google “restaurants near me”. You scroll down the list of places to eat and take into account a variety of factors: how high the ratings are, how many people have rated that restaurant, how far it is from you, whether or not it’s busy at that moment, the keywords mentioned in reviews, how long it’s open… the list goes on. You carefully bookmark each prospective restaurant so you can find it later. All of a sudden, you notice that without your knowledge, three hours have slipped by. You realize with a feeling of dread in your stomach that nearly all the restaurants around you are closed… and you head over to the nearest Whataburger in defeat.

A week later, life finds you in the same supine position on the couch, scrolling through restaurants. This time, though, you realize there’s a little compatibility rating next to each restaurant listing. As you scroll, you stumble upon a sushi restaurant that apparently is 90% compatible with your preferences. Without hesitation, you rush there with glee to find that it is everything you could have hoped for! Wow! Data science saves the day!

This very relatable experience is a prime example of how many of us have experienced data science in our lives without realizing it. Let’s take a quick moment to analyze how data science played the protagonist in this story. It is important to note that data science is a broad subject that encompasses a variety of things, including first gathering and shaping data, storing that data, then analyzing and visually presenting that data.

 

How Google Does It

Before we can start analyzing data, Google data scientists must first be able to gather information about everything from restaurant locations, hours, pricing, customer reviews, etc. Next, this massive influx of data must be efficiently manipulated and organized so it can quickly be retrieved, Marie Kondo style. Data scientists are then able to take and analyze this data and visually translate it into something that makes sense, such as the graph that displays the busiest hours at the restaurant, or the tidy list of restaurants you see in the app that is ordered by distance from you.

A simple action such as filtering by “Open Now” or “Price” requires a tight coordination of all of these steps in order to actually produce the output expected by the user. Amazingly, Google Maps is able to do this analysis real-time to constantly change its results based on your current location. Not only that, it is simultaneously analyzing every single person’s GPS data real-time. This allows them to generate components like the graph of how busy an establishment is at the moment.

 

Google Maps, A Man’s Best Friend

Another important factor in data science is using analysis to drive predictions (Read more here about the difference between data analytics and data science). For example, in calculating compatibility ratings, the program takes into account Google location history, search history, types of cuisine/restaurants you typically visit or avoid, whether you’ve saved/rated/visited a place or somewhere similar, or simply data that a user inputs about their dietary preferences. It also allows for constant feedback from the user if a compatibility rating seems off, with a “Not Right?” link attached to every rating. In other words, this rating is a prediction of how much you would like a restaurant based on your past history and behavior.

So how exactly has Google mastered this compatibility rating? Most likely, data scientists at Google have created algorithms to take the pieces of information listed above to produce a prediction. Essentially, it’s a way for a computer program to act more human. For example, think about how you recommend a show to your best friend. Most likely, you know your friend’s personality and history of shows that they’ve enjoyed, so you generally know what kind of show they may like watching.

Similarly, data scientists can use algorithms and statistical models to write code that continuously “learns” to make better predictions, creating an adaptable learning machine. With machine learning and artificial intelligence, Google is able to generate friendly human-like recommendations for over a billion people every single month, which is probably better than what your best friend could do.

When Robots Take Over the World

As the data science field continues to progress and we get closer and closer to true artificial intelligence, we will most likely see the effects of that trickle down into the parts of our everyday life that we hardly consider. We already trust the algorithms and generated recommendations that suggest where or when to eat. Eventually, even something as vital as a life-altering surgery will be dictated by recommendations generated by algorithms for doctors. Understanding and learning about data science will become more significant as it gradually becomes enmeshed with society in ways we may not even be able to fully comprehend. Read more here about Codeup’s 18-week Data Science program which covers most of the topics mentioned in this article, including data visualization, analytics, and machine learning.

Joyce Ling is a software developer at a cloud security company based in Richardson, TX. In her free time, she sings in a women’s chorus, rock climbs, plays guitar, and currently runs an organization to bring queer women together in the Dallas/Ft. Worth metroplex. 

Follow her on Instagram @ironicsushi or read more of her work at The Luscious Word.

Debugging with Codey the Rubber Duck

By Jennifer Walker

I first encountered rubber duck debugging while attending Codeup. Each student had a duck at their seat on the first day of our 18 ½ week advanced full stack web development boot camp. The expression of each duck varied, but they all stared quietly and blankly at us as we took in our surroundings with excitement and anticipation. At the time, I had no idea what it was for or why we needed that bath time friend. Now I do.

Part of what I love about programming is the problem-solving. However, in the attempt to figure out a software solution the developer very often can get tunnel vision – stuck on solving a problem the same wrong way or just get stumped with no real direction. This is where rubber duck debugging is the most useful. It originated from a book called “The Pragmatic Programmer” by Andrew Hunt and David Thomas.

Rubber duck debugging is simple. It includes taking the problem you are trying to solve and explaining it out loud to the rubber duck. This may seem silly because most of us have not talked to inanimate objects since we were kids. However, by doing this it forces a developer to think in a different way and to look at an issue under a microscope. Talking out loud activates a different part of the human brain, which very often helps the developer solve a problem without ever talking to another person. It keeps us from wasting our own time and the time of others when the solution is right at our fingertips.

I have experienced this phenomenon myself when I try to explain aspects of programming to people who are not programmers. It forces me to think of programming in a different way. I have to lose the acronyms, and just speak plain English to a person who isn’t such an avid techie like myself. When I do that I walk away with new knowledge and a refreshed passion for what I have been discussing.

Codey, Codeup's Mascot
Photo: Photos By Marvin Pfeiffer / Staff Photographer

I also learned later that the rubber duck is the official mascot for Codeup. His name is Codey and he has a special meaning to me beyond just rubber duck debugging. I began to sketch him on the first day of class. Over time he began to express my struggles and triumphs while learning to code. He came alive for me and became a student of Codeup alongside me during my time there. If I had a bad day, he totally understood because he was in the fire with me. If I struggled to understand a concept, he got that too and listened while I talked to him about what I was trying to do. Now, as a proud graduate of Codeup working as a software developer at a fantastic company, I keep Codey with me. He is in my car and at my desk at work. He also sits on my desk at home – waiting patiently to hear my struggles and what I am trying to solve for that day.

If you do not have a rubber duck for debugging, I suggest you go out and get one!

Codeup Student Check In: Month 2

Codeup coding school

Codeup welcomed our newest cohort, the Wrangell cohort, on July 23. With the start of this cohort, we are launching a new blog series: the Codeup Student Check In. We’ll interview a student over the course of the 4.5 months to see how things are progressing from first impressions all the way to graduation. Thus, welcome to the Codeup Student Check In: Month 2!

We took the time to sit down with our Wrangell student to see how they’ve been doing so far!

Codeup: Describe what you’re learning right now. Is it hard/fun/challenging?

Wrangell Student: In this section of the curriculum we are learning about the basics of Java and the building blocks that make up the language. This language is more verbose than previous material, and one of the hardest parts is understanding the instructions and translating them to code.

C: How has the learning process/information gathering been?

S: A wide variety of resources are available. In addition to the curriculum, I utilize the Head First Java book and the Oracle documentation. Another challenge is combining the knowledge from all these resources into one.

C: How do you feel your skill level compares to last month?

S: Comparing my skill level now with that of last month is no contest. Everyone around me is improving as well and I am excited to see my classmates skill levels growing. Our skills are improving exponentially!

C: How have the instructors and staff been helpful?

S: The instructors hold study hall before class and after to give us extra help. They’re constantly posting resources in our slack channel and encouraging us to ask questions. They have no problem going back to review material or clarify any questions we have. At the same time, they encourage our learning. They don’t give us the answer if it’s obvious or an easily searchable question.

C: Share a fun experience you had at Codeup!

Our great staff gave us some very cool thermoses. I’m a diehard sticker fan. I immediately ordered coding and anime related stickers for this thermos and they’re going straight on the thermos the moment they come in!

C: What has been the most memorable part of this month and has anything exciting happened?

S: Codeup expanded onto the 6th floor of the Vogue building, so we’re coding in a totally different environment. It’s full of natural light, which makes me very happy. I personally love heights so it’s great to look out the windows while taking a break from coding.

Something exciting that happened was that I got my first star! Instructors give us stars for asking good questions. I’m the type of person who needs to google the answer first before asking something. I wouldn’t want to ask something that is easily available on the internet. However, Java is very challenging, and I just needed to ask questions and I got a star! Super exciting!

 

Codeup’s Data Science Career Accelerator is Here!

The rumors are true! The time has arrived. Codeup has officially opened applications to our new Data Science career accelerator, with only 25 seats available! This immersive program is one of a kind in San Antonio, and will help you land a job in Glassdoor’s #1 Best Job in America.

Data Science is a method of providing actionable intelligence from data. The data revolution has hit San Antonio, resulting in an explosion in Data Scientist positions across companies like USAA, Accenture, Booz Allen Hamilton, and HEB. We’ve even seen UTSA invest $70 M for a Cybersecurity Center and School of Data Science. We built a program to specifically meet the growing demands of this industry.

Our program will be 18 weeks long, full-time, hands-on, and project-based. Our curriculum development and instruction is led by Senior Data Scientist, Maggie Giust, who has worked at HEB, Capital Group, and Rackspace, along with input from dozens of practitioners and hiring partners. Students will work with real data sets, realistic problems, and the entire data science pipeline from collection to deployment. They will receive professional development training in resume writing, interviewing, and continuing education to prepare for a smooth transition to the workforce.

We focus on applied data science for immediate impact and ROI in a business, which is how we can back it all up with a 6 month tuition refund guarantee – just like our existing Web Dev program. We’re focusing on Data Science with Python, SQL, and ML, covered in 14 modules: 1) Fundamentals; 2) Applied statistics; 3) SQL; 4) Python; 5) Supervised machine learning – regression; 6) Supervised machine learning – classification; 7) Unsupervised machine learning – clustering; 8) Time series analysis; 9) Anomaly detection; 10) Natural language processing; 11) Distributed machine learning; 12) Advanced topics (deep learning, NoSQL, cloud deployment, etc.); 13) Storytelling with data; and 14) Domain expertise development.

Applications are now open for Codeup’s first Data Science cohort, which will start class on February 4, 2019. Hurry – there are only 25 seats available! To further our mission of cultivating inclusive growth, scholarships will be available to women, minorities, LGBTQIA+ individuals, veterans, first responders, and people relocating to San Antonio.

If you want to learn about joining our program or hiring our graduates, email datascience@codeup.com!

ITT Tech Closes, New Model of Education Rises

ITT Tech Closes, New Model of Education Rises

A New Model of Education

The recent closure of ITT Tech highlights the time barriers, financial risk, and poor career prospects that are finally catching up with the traditional for-profit education industry. So what can students do instead?

Forbes Magazine ranked San Antonio as the American city with the 15th highest rate of job growth in 2015 – no surprise given our city’s recent swell in tech and entrepreneurship. The boom has created a mismatch between a surplus of available jobs for developers and a shortage of local technical talent. Codeup, a career accelerator for new software developers, has begun bridging that gap by training 267 developers and creating $5.8 million in new tech salaries since 2013.

Codeup is different from traditional models of continued education. Four-year universities and two-year technical schools often no longer serve students’ needs. The recent closure of ITT Tech, one of the nation’s largest for-profit educational institutions, is a great example. Tuition at schools like ITT Tech, DeVry, and Kaplan is high ($45,000 – $90,000), they have been found to use predatory lending practices, and they rank highest among colleges that leave students in the most debt. Graduates of ITT Tech San Antonio who received federal financial aid earned an average salary of only $38,400 ten years after completion, just barely above the national average for the category. Their overwhelming time commitment, high tuition fees, and limited career support make it hard for students to complete degrees and advance their careers.

ITT Tech Closes, Another Door Opens…

Given the decline of these diploma mills and a changing jobscape, other forms of education have exploded. The new reality is that the traditional college student archetype is now a minority, while demands for alternative, dynamic educational models are only increasing. Students need a better way to enter the workforce with relevant technical skills.  

As a four-month intensive career accelerator, Codeup offers something special: a place where students can find like-minded peers and launch a new career. Our classroom-based program turns non-techies into software developers. In addition to excellent technical instruction, students receive one-on-one career guidance and gain opportunities to connect with employers. If a graduate cannot find employment within 6 months, Codeup offers a tuition back guarantee. We partner with multiple reputable loan and grant partners to make financing easy, and also accepts GI benefits. Graduates have increased their salary by $17K in the first year on average.

In light of the recent closings of ITT Tech across the country, students should pause to reconsider their educational path choices. Codeup is San Antonio local, dedicated to providing students with community, professional independence, and technical literacy. Are traditional models the best option, or might Codeup offer something better?

If you want to learn more about that, call us. We’re always here to help!