Getting Hired in a Remote Environment

Graphic that explains the purpose of blog; How you can get hired in a remote environment

As a career accelerator with a tuition refund guarantee, we have always been focused on employment outcomes for our students. Going Remote hasn’t changed that! We thought we’d pause today to explain how. 

 

First of all, our career placement services are built on one-on-one relationships. Our Employer Partnership Managers work with students individually to develop a professional portfolio, define a strategy, and conduct a job search. And they don’t let off until you’ve signed that offer letter! Since we’ve gone remote, our placement team has digitized their curriculum so it’s accessible to all our students, and they’ve continued working one-on-one over Zoom. 

 

Those one-on-one relationships aren’t exclusive to students. It’s the same approach our team takes with their network of hiring managers and recruiters. From curriculum advisory panels to guest speaker lunchtime talks, we involve employers as often as we can. We forge a personal relationship that encourages repeat hiring, open communication, and trust.

 

Lastly, your job search kicks off with a bang in our staple Developer Days and Data Scientist Days. Normally, these are in-person demonstrations of capstone projects that end in a reverse job fair with employers. On April 16th, we hosted our first-ever virtual Developer Day. Over 160 people tuned into it live! Not only did we maintain the quality of the event, but we increased attendance and visibility. That event, especially while remote, kick starts your job search, connects you with employers, and increases your visibility as a candidate.

 

In person or remote, we remain committed to empowering life change and helping our students land jobs in new career fields. 

If you’ve been affected by COVID-19 in any way (layoffs, health, family, etc), check out our recently announced COVID-19 Relief Scholarship.

The Remote Codeup Student Experience

Codeup Remote Classroom Experience

Communities across Texas have now lived in a remote environment for weeks. While we hoped for good news early on, Governor Abbott’s recent announcement to close schools for the remainder of the school year has confirmed that the new normal amid COVID-19 is remote. A lot of prospective students are left asking: what now? Our answer is simple: little has changed! While we are now conducting class digitally, the rest of the Codeup experience looks the same. Here’s how!

Codeup differs from traditional degrees and online programs because we offer live, full-time, and immersive instruction. Even now, our classes are taught by a team of passionate instructors whose backgrounds range from 20+ years of industry experience to Master Degrees in Adult Education. Each class is led by 2-3 expert instructors and supported by a Teaching Assistant. They deliver live lectures, respond to you in real-time, provide 1:1 support, and individualize your learning to set you up for success. Comparing us to an online boot camp is like comparing a virtual reality experience to a regular TV show. We’re still giving live instruction, we’re just teaching from behind a laptop instead of a podium.

In addition to live instruction, our students enjoy live co-learning. You’re not in this alone! In fact, our cohorts of 20-25 students provide a built-in structure of camaraderie, networking, and technical support. Some of the best learning you can do is by teaching to and learning from other students, a benefit that is lost in attending a part-time or self-paced program.

The combination of live instruction and peer-peer connectivity produces a third benefit: accountability. In this remote world where your couch is your desk, it can be challenging to stay focused and motivated. Our immersive program builds accountability through a daily course schedule, project-based learning, social support, and a helping hand. [Editor’s note: if this weren’t important and learning to code on your own were easy, I’d be writing Java right now instead of a blog post!]

Lastly, the reason Codeup offers a 100% tuition refund guarantee is that we teach directly to the needs of employer partners. Right now, more than ever before, employers need employees who are adaptable and able to work remotely! The digital Codeup experience prepares you to communicate, collaborate, and code remotely, a skill that was already valuable in the tech industry. If anything, you’re getting a little extra bang for your buck by learning a skillset most developers have to earn the hard way.

Although we wish we were on campus high-fiving, writing code, and re-enacting Star Wars lightsabers battles, we’ve realized that’s not really what the Codeup experience is about. The true Codeup experience is about learning to code from experienced professionals alongside passionate students in a live, hands-on environment that offers a 100% tuition refund guarantee. That’s what you can always expect from Codeup, whether we’re remote or not.

If you’ve been affected by COVID-19 in any way (layoffs, health, family, etc.), check out our recently announced COVID-19 Relief Scholarship.

Discovering My Passion Through Codeup

Headshot of WebDevelopment Alumni, Miguel. Beside the title graphic "Discovering my passion through Codeup"

On February 27th, 2020, I completed an intensive career accelerator program to become a Full-Stack Web Developer! It was a great experience that made me feel right at home. Solving problems, planning, and developing projects all aligned perfectly with my passions and hobbies.

 

Out of the 670+ hours spent developing, there were moments when I would feel the stress, frustration, and discouragement when my source code wouldn’t produce my expected outcome. However, I believed in my abilities and persevered. I continued to work diligently on every project until it was successfully complete. The hard work wasn’t easy, but it was extremely rewarding. It is commonly said, “If you love what you do, it won’t feel like work” and I truly what I love to do! I can honestly say that my career is my passion.

 

The impact this program has had on me is unforgettable. I’ve left this program with a new career, knowledge, experience, and skills; but also friends that share the same passion as myself. It was beyond my expectations. I am extremely grateful for the friendships created, the instructors who always had time to help, and the staff that solidified this entire experience. My drive and passion have led me here and I’m eager to embark on this journey to keep learning and continue developing.

 


Are you ready to discover your passion? Then make sure to check out our programs and give us a call, we’d love to help you find the career of your dreams!

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Miguel Garcia is a Software developer in the San Antonio, TX. Connect with him on Linkedin!

15 Tips on How to Prepare For Virtual Interviews and Meetings

In response to the spread of COVID-19, many companies are making the switch to remote work – which means their hiring processes are moving remote, too. Our Student Placement Team recognizes that preparing for a video job interview involves different considerations and logistics than an in-person one. We’re sharing the tips they’ve gathered and have been coaching our students around to ensure you’re set up for success!
  1. Use your computer, not your phone for video calls. 
  2. Test audio and camera at least 15 minutes prior to the scheduled interview. If sound quality isn’t great, use a headset or earphones to avoid an echo.
  3. Elevate your laptop with books, board games, etc. so your camera is at eye level to avoid staring down into the camera.
  4. Dress professionally—and not just from the top up! Dress the part to act the part.
  5. Make sure your username is your first and last name (as shown on your resume), and it is properly capitalized.
  6. Position yourself at a table, against a plain and neutral background. Avoid positioning yourself by a window and make sure there is no clutter around you.
  7. Check the lighting in the room. Light the room from the front and not from the back.
  8. Close all other applications on your laptop and turn off notifications.
  9. Silence your cell phone and disable vibration.
  10. Have a copy of your resume on hand.
  11. Attach post-its around the laptop screen with prompts and questions you wish to ask the interviewer
  12. Exclude kids, pets, etc. from the room during the interview.
  13. Have a pen and paper on hand.
  14. Have a glass of water next to you.
  15. Have the phone number of the interviewer in case the video connection is lost. 
On a career search and looking for more tips? Our team of professionals is here to help! Contact us to learn more about how Codeup can help you in your career journey! Many of these tips were referenced from The New Rules of Work by Alexandra Cavoulacos and Kathryn Minshew. If you found these tips useful, check out the book, and don’t forget to share them with a friend to help them on their career search!

How To Have A Second Career Start With Codeup

Grow your technical skills for a second career start with Codeup

 

     A lot of students enter Codeup from a previous career. We encounter diverse professionals from teaching, military service, the service industry, music, and more. From those prospective students thinking about a change, we often hear concerns like: “I don’t have any technical skills or background,” “I’m just a teacher,” “I’m only a barista,” “I’m only a hobby computer person”…”I could never be a software developer.”

 

     The good news is YOU, the people with a wide variety of non-software development backgrounds, are our specialty. At Codeup, you’ll leverage the qualities that make you good at what you already do, to excel in a new field.

 

     If you’re thinking about switching careers, you’ve probably already followed a plan: you listened to advice from a guidance counselor, went to college, developed a skill set, landed a job, and grew in your role. But maybe you found the day-to-day wasn’t what you expected, that what you’re good at isn’t good for you, or even that you want to learn and grow more. Maybe you need a second start?

 

     With over 574 alumni, we’ve heard that story a lot. We’ve also seen some surprising trends in common careers before entering Codeup. If you want a change but worry about the leap, check out some of the wide-ranging jobs Codeup grads come from and how their skills made them successful in the tech industry:

 

Teacher/Educator

  • Deep understanding of how to learn and study
  • The ability to understand someone else’s point of view
  • Experience structuring your time, managing a massive workload, and maximize output.
  • How to move yourself and others past learning barriers

 

Server/Barista

  • A work ethic focused on the need of your customers
  • The ability to think outside the box to find a solution
  • Experience working on a team to accomplish something special

 

Musician/Creative

  • Experience learning, reading, and becoming fluent in different non-verbal languages
  • The ability to build something new based on a set of parameters (a key signature, genre, and instrumentation is a lot like a programming language, functionality, and customer)
  • The skill of using your base knowledge to improvise a tune on the fly

 

     One of the biggest misconceptions we hear from prospective students is that they are at a disadvantage coming from a non-technical background. In fact, your background, whatever it is, is an ADVANTAGE in learning a new skill and entering the tech workforce. There are plenty of CS graduates, but there are very few Marine-veteran-musician-digital marketers turned software developers.

     Want to see for yourself? Hear from our students as they share their career stories, and see how far they’ve gone as developers! 

     If you’re looking for a second start and see yourself in any of the above careers or skills, we’d love to help you find your passion. Connect with our Admissions team to learn more.

 

2019: A Codeup Year In Review

Codeup in 2019

It’s official – 2019 has come and gone and we’ve hit 2020 fast! At the start of this new year, we like to reflect on 2019, giving gratitude to everyone who supported us and celebrating our many shared victories. It was a year of life changes, ground-breaking firsts, and growth.

After such a big year for our community and students, we wanted to share some of our reflection highlights with you! Here’s what happened in 2019:

2019 Firsts

  1. Launched San Antonio’s FIRST and ONLY Data Science career accelerator
  2. Graduated San Antonio’s first class of Data Scientists
  3. Expanded our program to Dallas, TX
  4. Named San Antonio #2 Best Place to Work

By the numbers

  • 129 # of individuals who changed their careers at Codeup
  • 574 total # of Codeup alumni network
  • 16 # of alumni placed in Dallas
  • 25% military veteran students
  • 27% female students
  • 52% racial and ethnic minority students
  • $189,053.81 amount of scholarship funds given by Codeup to its students
  • 49 # of partner companies who hired from us
  • $6,327,295.40 salaries earned by Codeup grads in their first jobs as Software Devs and Data Scientists

Our mission is to empower life change. If 2019 wasn’t your year, maybe 2020 will be 🙂 Reach out to us – we’d love to help you create your future!

How To Pick A Coding Bootcamp Curriculum

How to Pick A Coding Bootcamp Curriculum

If you’re thinking about entering a career as a software developer, you’ve probably researched a few different bootcamps. During your research, you’ve probably seen a few different curriculum. Without already BEING a software developer, it’s hard to know what’s what. In this post, we want to explore how to think about a bootcamp curriculum, and recommend strategies about how to consider the best fit.

Let’s start with some terminology. Full-stack web development integrates work on both the front-end and the back-end. The front-end is the user-facing side that you interact with in a web browser. The back-end is the server side that involves the sending and receiving of data. Consider a restaurant website. A front-end only website would show a restaurant menu with prices, dishes, and ordering information. A full-stack web application would allow you to not only view the menu, but place an order and process payment information for that order, interacting with a database and back-end functionality.

Within that understanding, there are a few groupings of technologies:

  • Object Oriented Programming and back-end tech: This list includes programming languages like PHP, Java, C#, Ruby, and Node.js. These allow you to build functionalities into a web application. 
  • Database tools: Tools like MySQL, MongoDB, PostgreSQL, SQL Server, and Oracle let you store, send, and receive information.
  • Front-end technologies: Languages and frameworks like JavaScript, Angular, React, HTML, and CSS let you design a front-end interface.
  • Web frameworks: Spring Boot and Laravel are examples of web frameworks that help you stand up web applications more efficiently. 
  • Testing tools: In production, many companies leverage a methodology called Test Driven Development. This is when developers write tests first, and code second, letting them compare their code against a standard of approval. Common technologies include JUnit, PHPUnit, NUnit, MSTest, Jasmine.

With so many technologies out there, it can be hard to pick what’s best to learn. But here’s the secret: the specific technologies do not matter. The most important thing you’ll learn during a coding bootcamp is how to use these different categories of technologies. Whether you learn PHP or Java, MySQL or  SQL Server, the important takeaways are the fundamental concepts learned. Many Codeup alumni graduate from our Full-Stack Java program and go on to work in PHP, Python, Ruby, Groovy, and other languages. Ultimately, a loop is a loop and an array is an array. Languages differ, but once you’ve learned an OOP language, the differences become syntactical instead of conceptual. 

This leads us to an important point: the more technologies, the worse! The quality of a curriculum, and thus the value of it, is not defined by the number of technologies covered. In fact, it’s the opposite. Let’s give some examples.

Columbia University is one of the premier academic institutions in the world. They are an Ivy League university with a strong reputation. They recently expanded into the bootcamp space, and launched a web development program that covers the following technologies: HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript, jQuery, Bootstrap, Express.js, React.js, Node.js, Database Theory, MongoDB, MySQL, Command Line, Git, and more. All of that in 12 weeks. Let’s decode that for you with the terms we’ve already used. This curriculum promises to teach you:

  • Object Oriented Programming and back-end tech: Node.js
  • Database tools: Database theory, MondoDB, MySQL
  • Front-end technologies: HTML, CSS, jQuery, Bootstrap, Express.js, React.js

Now let’s look at Codeup. We teach: HTML, CSS, JavaScript, jQuery, Java, Spring, MySQL. All of that, in 20 weeks. In the terms we’ve discussed, that’s: 

  • Object Oriented Programming and back-end tech: Java, Spring
  • Database tools: MySQL
  • Front-end technologies: HTML, CSS, JavaScript, jQuery

The common initial thought is: why spend 20 weeks learning seven technologies when you could spend 12 weeks learning 10? And there lies the misconception. Many bootcamp curricula promise to teach you the latest and greatest technologies: React.js, Angular.js, Express.js, MongoDB, Node.js, etc. etc. etc. That may sound like a better bang for your buck, but it’s all a question of priority. Here is the reality of your choices:

  • Columbia bootcamp, broad and shallow: gain exposure to a wide variety of technologies in a short amount of time
  • Codeup, narrow and deep: gain expertise in software development fundamentals in a narrow scope of technologies

There is no inherent right answer here – it’s all about your priorities. That being said, here’s what we believe: Learning how to learn, learning how to think like a developer, and learning to program is far more important than gaining exposure to the latest web frameworks. When you understand programming fundamentals, you prepare yourself to learn whatever you want. It’s like learning how to work with a car: it’s great to know how to drive an Audi, but it’s pretty different from understanding how an Audi engine works and how it differs from a Honda. 

At Codeup, we focus on crafting you into a software developer. We focus on programming fundamentals, core web technologies, and applied practices. When you graduate, you’ve landed a job and have the skills to learn any technology. If that sounds like what you’re looking for, connect with our Admissions Team and we can tell you more! 

Click here to hear our Codeup Alumnus, Po Lin’s, story about his journey graduating with a Computer Science degree and how he supplemented Codeup’s curriculum to launch a career into software development!

The Best Path To A Career In Software Development

Best Path To A Career In Software Development (Is Not Always a Four Year Degree)

“Don’t I need a Computer Science degree to get a job as a software developer?” As a non-traditional educational model, we hear this concern a lot. Prospective students often compare us to four year degrees in CS with the concern that lacking a piece of paper and formal degree will prevent them from getting a job. We’re here to tell you once and for all: college is NOT the best way to become a software developer.

For the avoidance of doubt, there is a lot of merit to a four year degree, as well as a lot of valuable knowledge from a CS program that can apply to life as a developer. However, if your goal is to get a job as a software developer, there’s a more direct path.

Think of it this way:my plumbing is old and broken, and I need to replace it all. I hire a PhD in Fluid Dynamics – someone who really understands flow, gravity, resistance, momentum, and all the intricacies of what’s happening in my pipes. They come and explain how everything is supposed to work in my new pipes, charge me $5,000 for their time, and then leave. With my pipes still broken, I decided to hire a plumber – someone who knows how to identify the problem and fix it,and a week later my plumbing is fully functional and I’ve only spent $2,500. [Note, we kind of made these numbers up to illustrate a point. After all, we’re no drain surgeons.]

The message here is simple: theory is not the same thing as practical experience. With the rapid growth in web and IT, we’re no longer just dealing with cutting-edge technologies. Development is becoming the new blue-collar factory work, and the amount of code out there is astounding. It’s no longer as important to have high-level abstract education. Instead, the top priority is up-to-date practical experience.

Now, let’s get more specific. Why exactly is a coding bootcamp the better way to get a job as a software developer?

#1 Technologies: Technology changes at the speed of light. One day the popular framework is Angular, and the next it’s React. In one generation, companies are building with C++ and in the next they’re building with Java. Because of this rate of change, it’s hard for traditional learning environments to keep pace. While they continue to teach C++, we’ve moved on to Java with a Spring framework and MySQL database. Because we’re more agile, we are able to keep pace with industry trends.

#2 Curriculum structure: Have you ever watched Top Chef or The Great British Bake Off? You were probably pretty entertained, but how did that seared Ahi Tuna with orange mint avocado salsa and balsamic vinegar reduce amuse-bouche turn out? The sad reality is, watching experts do their thing doesn’t make you an expert. Nor does listening to lectures. Our program is built around the concept of praxis, which is essentially the practical application of theory, or the blending of theory and practice. Half of your 670 program hours are spent actually writing code, so you develop the muscle memory and experience of programming. This career is like an old-time trade, like becoming a blacksmith: you have to learn from masters and practice, practice, practice.

#3 Job placement services: If education is your goal, stop reading now. If a career is your goal, then you’re in the right place. Most undergraduate institutions have career service offices where you can get advice on your resume and attend job fairs. But Codeup makes you a promise: get a job after graduation or get 100% of your money back. There are no two ways about that: our singular focus is your outcome. Unlike traditional institutions, we sell jobs, not education. 

#4 Programming hours: This is similar to number 2, but so important that it’s worth repeating. The single most important thing a would-be developer can do is spend time writing code. Practice, practice, practice is the lesson above all else. You need to engage with the problem-solving cycle, learn how to fail, and learn to overcome the barriers inherent in programming. It’s a lot like learning an instrument. When you start out, you struggle to play single notes. You then practice scales and exercises, and before long you’re playing songs, thinking about the intonation and sound over playing the notes. With programming, you need to spend hours to get the basics under your fingers in order to graduate to complex problem-solving and application development. At Codeup, you spend 670 hours in hands-on, instructor-led classroom time. For those of you who like math, that’s roughly equivalent to the number of hours in a four-year degree. It just happens in 5 months, and those hours are hands-on.

If you’re still not convinced, consider the story of Po. Po graduated from Trinity University with a 4 year degree in Computer Science. He graduated with a good GPA, but couldn’t find work as a web developer for a whole year. Companies told him he didn’t have enough full-stack experience, a big enough portfolio, and was lacking modern technologies and languages. So, he came to Codeup. He paired his theory knowledge with our practical knowledge and landed a job immediately upon graduation. Since then, he’s moved to Dallas to join Cognizant, where he’s been able to double his salary and move into a new position as a lead developer. Learn more about Po’s journey here.

So, you want to be a software developer? A career accelerator like Codeup is the path for you. Still not convinced? Contact us and we’ll talk it out.

Financial Aid Options For Your Investment

Financial Aid Options For Your Investment

Anyone who has ever thought about a coding bootcamp has probably run up against this first barrier: the investment. Paying for a bootcamp is scary and confusing because it’s different from traditional education. There are no Pell grants or FAFSA loans. The university tuition center doesn’t process your application 6 months in advance. Today’s blog is here to break down financial aid and tuition funding for bootcamps.

First off, if you want to attend a bootcamp, there are a lot of ways to make it work financially. We recommend starting with the question of “Is this the right path for me?” instead of “Can I afford this investment?”, so you don’t count yourself out before the race starts.

Now, let’s dive into the types of tuition funding available:

  • Self-payment: This is the most straightforward form of payment. Many bootcamps will accept cash, check, credit card, and ACH. Some will even accept bitcoin! 
  • Loans: Probably the most common payment type is to secure a loan through a private third-party provider. A loan is when an entity lends you money that you repay over time with interest. Students are likely familiar with loans from FAFSA, but the bootcamp space is a little different. Traditional degree-granting colleges and universities are accredited and governed under the federal Department of Education. That means they are eligible for federal funding for student loans. However, most bootcamps do not grant credit and are not accredited. Since the emergence of the bootcamp model, we have also seen the growth in private providers who are specifically tailored to the bootcamp model. For example, Codeup partners with SkillsFund, Climb, and Meritize
  • Grants: A grant is a source of funding paid on your behalf without a requirement to be repaid, most often targeted at a particular mission. Many grants focus on workforce development and unemployment support. For example, Codeup partners with Workforce Solutions Alamo, Project QUEST, Skill QUEST, and Alamo Colleges who have provided grant funding for students to lower their tuition costs.
  • Scholarships: Scholarships fall into two buckets: externally-funded and internally-funded. Externally-funded scholarships are those where a third party, other than the school and the individual, pays for a portion of tuition. Internal scholarships are usually offered as tuition discounts from the school itself. For example, Codeup offers about $27,000 per class in scholarships to women, minorities, LGBTQIA, veterans, and first responders to increase access to tech careers.
  • VA Benefits: The last and least common form of tuition payment is VA Benefits. There are two groups here. Schools that have been in operation for over 2 years can apply to utilize VA Educational Benefits so transitioning service members and military veterans can use government benefits to cover school costs, most commonly with the Post 9-11 GI Bill. The second type of benefit falls under Employment Benefits, through which eligible providers can accept Vocational Rehabilitation, allowing veterans with 10% or more of service related disability to re-skill. Codeup was one of the first bootcamps to be approved by the VA and offers both of the above forms of benefits. Schools must go through a rigorous approval process and ongoing compliance requirements to accept these benefits.

Now that you have an understanding of the types of benefits for your investment, let’s understand their relatives pros and cons. 

                          Type of funding                            

                                    Pros                                 

Cons

Self-payment

No interest

No application process

Full payment due up front

Loans

Deferred tuition paymentLoan interest accrues

Grants

Free money!Application and eligibility determination process
ScholarshipsFree money!

Not everyone is eligible

VA BenefitsTuition and monthly housing stipend

Only veterans and dependents are eligible

What’s next? The remaining problem is that planning your tuition is still a complicated and multifaceted process. You have to explore grant eligibility, apply for scholarships, qualify for loans, and arrange payments. To help you through this, at Codeup, we have a full-time Enrollment and Financial Aid Manager on staff to help you!

Get started at codeup.com/apply to start the conversation around the financial aid you qualify for your future career in tech!

Hey Dallas, Meet Your Software Development Mentors!

Meet Your Dallas Mentors!

We may be new to town here in Dallas, but Codeup has a long history of training software developers. After launching our first class in February 2014, we’ve now successfully trained 574 alumni. So while the streets might look different around 75202, the code looks the same. To anyone nervous about trusting us ‘newbies’ with your careers, meet the incredible team of software development mentors you’ll get to learn from. 

Professionally, Douglas Hirsh and Fernando Mendoza have over 30 years of industry experience between them. They’ve worked at household names like CitiBank and bring a wide range of diverse industry experience across gaming, oil, and SAAS. Combined, they also bring nearly 10 years of formal teaching experience. Fernando worked as an instructor over the weekends while he was going through University for four years, and is also one of our most tenured instructors with almost 4 years of Codeup experience under his belt. PS, that’s over 20 cohorts and 400 students! Douglas is a life long mentor, but also taught at another coding bootcamp earlier in his career before joining Codeup.

Technically, the pair is experienced in a wide range of languages and technologies, including: 

  • OOP and back-end tech: PHP, Java, C#, Ruby, Node.js, Visual Basic, VB.NET, Andriod Development
  • Database tools: MySQL, MongoDB, PostgreSQL, SQL Server, Oracle
  • Front-end technologies: JavaScript, Angular, React, HTML, CSS, JQuery, Ajax, PWA apps
  • Web frameworks: Spring Boot, Laravel, CodeIgniter, ASP.NET Web Forms/MVC/Web API
  • Testing tools: JUnit, PHPUnit, NUnit, MSTest, Jasmine

But what’s our favorite part of this dynamic duo? They come from opposite ends of the development world. 

Douglas is a self-taught programmer. He started self-teaching at the age of 12 with a C++ book, and by the time he was 19 he was being paid to write code. Over the next 18 years, Douglas worked his way up to a Senior Developer and even a Chief Technology Officer. So although he wasn’t formally trained, Douglas knows not only the ins and outs of software development, but he also knows first-hand what it’s like to self-teach, learn on the job, and follow a non-traditional career path.

Fernando has also been programming since he was 15. He then received his BS in Computer Systems Engineering from the Institute of Technology in Uruapan, Mexico. Over the next 12 years, he progressed from a Jr. Developer to a Senior Web Developer. He even has his own freelance web development agency. With his formal background, Fernando brings deep expertise in software architecture, database design and administration, and CS theory.

When you join Codeup Dallas, you first and foremost join a classroom to learn alongside Senior Developers with 30+ years of practical experience and 10+ years of teaching experience. Contact us today to learn about kickstarting your career in software development in the quickly growing Dallas market!

Join us for our next learn to code workshop, where you will get to meet and learn from your Dallas software developer mentors! Click here to find workshops and more at our Codeup Dallas campus.