How Codeup Alumni are Helping to Make Water

Codeup Alumni Help Make Water featuring Jacqueline Murralles, James Murralles, Ted Zamarron, and Carlos Teller

Imagine having a kit mailed to you with all the necessary components to make contaminated water clean. Cool, huh? Four of our alumni are helping to make that possible by partnering with the non-profit Elequa to design a website for their Make Water program. With this project, these Codeup alumni have the potential to make a global impact: Jacqueline Murralles, James Murralles, Ted Zamarron, and Carlos Teller. 

How Elequa is Making a Difference

The Make Water program inspires, educates, and equips people that want to make a tangible difference in the world. Elequa puts together DIY kits with the tools to purify water and delivers them to people that need them, locally and abroad. This project is also given to students in the San Antonio area, who in turn are challenged to research, tweak, and further develop the kits to make them better and more accessible. These problem-solving challenges engage students in the STEM field, inspiring teamwork and collaboration while making a difference that they can be proud of: helping to provide clean water.

How Codeup Alumni are Making a Difference

Currently, the Make Water program lacks a platform to house and share the data gathered by students to improve the kits, while also challenging other community members for further development. They needed help with the gamification of these processes to make participation more engaging. That’s where Codeup alumni Jacqueline Murralles, James Murralles, Ted Zamarron, and Carlos Teller came in. They are helping Elequa to build an open-source application for the Make Water program that turns community participation into a game where users can level up as they contribute and collaborate through an array of real-world challenges in water research, coding, hardware innovation, and creative storytelling.

Did we mention that they are working on this project as volunteers, as Codeup alumni often do? Codeup students are always looking for ways to challenge themselves, sharpen their skills, and make a difference, and that continues after graduation. To see more of the projects our students have worked on (and what you can do, too, with Codeup), check out these capstone presentations.

Alumni Share their Journey into Web Development

Alumni Bridget Mills and Eddy Bautista Share their Journey into Web Development

Everyone starts somewhere. Many developers out there didn’t grow up wanting to code. It’s something they fell into over time, much like two Codeup alumni, Bridget Mills and Eddy Bautista. These two software developers graduated from our Web Development class in December 2019. They came back for a virtual panel event to share their journey into web development and to give advice to people wanting to become a software developer.

 

What were you doing before Codeup?

Eddy had been a sales assistant for years and was a student at San Antonio College studying Kinesiology.

Bridget worked at a courthouse, but those career plans were altered after becoming a military spouse and moving. She went back to school for a degree in Information Technology (IT), specializing in System Engineering, and became an IT Specialist.

 

What led you to a career in coding?

When someone he knew mentioned coding, Eddy learned all he could and coded for three days using online courses and tutorials. He immediately knew this was what he wanted to do as a career. 

While Bridget was working at the lawyer’s office, a development team came in to help with court systems. She asked them questions and became fascinated by what they were doing. After deciding not to pursue law, she decided to go back to school for IT. Her job as an IT Specialist isn’t exactly what she had in mind, but her degree didn’t offer the coding experience necessary to become a developer, which was her true end goal. Even after moving to Hawaii and having two kids, that dream persisted. Her cousin, a developer, mentioned that some of her coworkers went to a coding bootcamp. With another kid and another move on the horizon, she decided she would enroll in a coding bootcamp when her family settled down in Texas. 

 

Why Codeup?

While researching how to become a developer, Eddy found Codeup. Our culture stood out to him, the admissions team was helpful, he liked that we offer help with the job search through resume assistance and interview training, and he really liked how plugged in we are to the San Antonio technology scene. He felt all the pieces coming together and could picture himself here.

For Bridget, it boiled down to the curriculum and hands-on experience. When she was in college, she learned a lot of theory, but didn’t get experience actually coding, which, as she learned the hard way, is what employers are really looking for. She looked into some options for coding bootcamps and Codeup stood out to her. It was big plus that even as a military spouse, she was able to use VA benefits. She loved our assistance with job placement, and noted that she had gone to school twice and neither college offered anything like that. 

 

What’s a typical day for you?

Currently, both panelists are working as developers for VIA Metropolitan Transit. Due to COVID-19, they’re both working from home.

Eddy usually starts his day early with a coding challenge on a website like Codewars. He has a virtual meeting with his mentor to discuss some code. For most of the day, they solve a problem or do some pair programming. They also have team meetings and daily standups.

Bridget is currently leading an Artificial Intelligence project with VIA that takes up most of her time. She usually has virtual meetings with members of her team, other teams at VIA, and contractors. She does documentation and uses programs to update the current status of her projects for the team to see. 

 

How is the work-life balance?

Coding is a hobby for Bridget. She takes her laptop with her from room to room, sometimes coding with her child in her lap. She loves it so much, she often works late unintentionally until her kids come in the room to check on her. Because of this, she doesn’t feel completely balanced but knows that it’s only because she loves it so much.

Eddy feels similarly, stating that when they do work late, it’s usually because they want to. The work-life balance has been good for him.

 

What advice would you give to someone thinking of attending Codeup’s Web Development program?

Bridget was nervous coming into Codeup, but it gave her everything she was looking for. Part of why she wanted to be a developer was because she thought they get to sit around alone, not having to interact with anybody. She very quickly realized this was not the case. “You have to speak up and you have to do it well, and often, with a lot of people. You’ll have to work hard, beyond the regular hours. Take advantage of all the resources. Schedule some meetups with peers to work together outside of class. It’s so worth it in the end. Just go for it!”

Eddy learned that keeping a part-time job is possible but really, really hard. He was one of the only students ever to finish Codeup while working a job, rushing to work right after class. He regrets doing that because he missed out on socializing and working together after hours. But when he had time, he always tried to work with other students to solve problems together, and encourages the same in others. “Break out of your comfort zone and don’t be scared to just start from where you are. The first couple weeks will be really hard, but learn to fall in love with the feeling of being stuck, because eventually you’ll be able to solve it.”

Bridget and Eddy are working together at VIA, but took very different pathways to get to where they are. Eddy hadn’t thought much about coding before deciding to dive right into it, whereas Bridget wanted a career as a developer for years. Whether coding is something you never gave much thought to or you’ve tried a different route before, you, too, can make a transition into web development with Codeup! If you’re interested in starting a career that you love in an ever-growing industry, apply today

How to Succeed in a Coding Bootcamp

Codeup Instructors Douglas Hirsh and Fernando Mendoza share their tips for how to succeed in a coding bootcamp

We held a virtual event called “How to Succeed in a Coding Bootcamp” featuring our Dallas-based Full-Stack Web Development instructors, Douglas Hirsh and Fernando Mendoza. To start our incoming students off on the right foot, we wanted to hear what advice they have to optimize a coding bootcamp experience. Check out their top tips below!

Practice

“Practical information and practical skills are going to be acquired by practicing every single day.” – Fernando

Practice is an essential part of learning something new. You could watch people bake all day long, and still not be any better of a baker yourself. That’s why our students spend more time actually writing code than listening to lectures. You’ll practice alone, with your cohort, and with instructor guidance. Through this practice, you will change the way you think and approach problems. The instructors agreed that practicing on your own through fun side projects, like creating a program to organize your baking recipes, sets the most successful students apart from the rest.

 

Consistency

“The reason Codeup is every weekday from 9-5 is because we need you to be fully invested. If you only coded on weekends or in your free time, you would forget everything you saw last time and wouldn’t be able to build upon what you know.” – Fernando

Don’t just practice. Practice consistently. Many of our students have tried the self-taught route and eventually ended up at Codeup. Why? Practicing every now and then doesn’t cut it when it comes to something as complex as programming, the same way practicing every now and then isn’t how you learn a language or an instrument. The way to succeed at something is by practicing it frequently and consistently. Codeup is fully immersive for that very purpose.

 

Prepare yourself

“The best thing you can do is the prework that we assign.” – Douglas

Help your future self by doing the prework assigned before the first day of class.. This isn’t just busy work. It’s for you and only you. We won’t take a grade on it, it’s really, entirely, to set yourself up for success. We will move incredibly fast and it will feel like drinking from a firehose, even if you did do the prework. Do future you a big favor by getting used to what drinking from a firehose feels like!

 

Problem solve

“Replace frustration with curiosity, then experimentation.” – Fernando

As you consistently practice the prework, you will come across errors. Instead of getting frustrated, let the errors trigger your curiosity of “why isn’t that working?” and “how do I get it to work?” You can google the keywords in the error message and figure out what to do. This gives you practice problem solving on your own instead of immediately asking someone else for help. While we love helping our students, we will expect you to have already tried to figure things out because we believe in your ability to problem solve. When you do need help, this process helps you frame your questions. We won’t give you answers, but we will happily point to a different way of thinking about an error. It will make getting it right that much more satisfying.

 

Active learning

“We want you to be in the mindset of understanding and not discovery. The prework is what takes you there.”- Fernando

Problem solving your way through the prework allows you to be an active participant in your own learning. You’re giving yourself exposure to a topic before class so that during the lecture, you’re not discovering something new, but trying to understand it. You might not get it the first time you see it, but now you know what to look out for in the lecture.

 

Failure is temporary

“Think about where you were 5 weeks ago. Use evidence over time that things have gotten better rather than dwelling on failure in the moment. Failure is learning. Failure is good.” – Douglas

As you progress through the program, you will face obstacles and failures, and you will doubt yourself as a programmer. When you feel like you can’t do something, compare yourself to who you were and what you could do 5 weeks ago, instead of comparing yourself to “real programmers.” After reminding yourself of your progress, think about what obstacles are keeping you from moving forward and how to overcome them, instead of defaulting to “I can’t.” Kevin Kelley once said, “Pros are just amateurs who know how to gracefully recover from their mistakes.”

Learn to communicate

“We have you do group projects and paired programming projects and you get a lot of really good experience working with people remotely. It’s a really good skill to have.” – Douglas

Programmers are not in a room alone all day with 10 screens in front of them. They are frequently communicating with their team, with different teams, and with different clients. You’ll need to know how to storytell and how to present your work and yourself. Throughout the course, you will frequently be working with others and presenting to others. Now that we’ve gone remote, our students are learning to work together from far apart.

 

How successful you are in a coding bootcamp starts with you and how much you’re willing to put in. If you’re ready to continue putting in time and effort, check out our events. Our workshops will give you exposure to code, and our panels will let you hear the perspectives of people who made the same career change you’re hoping for. You got this! Together, we’ll help you succeed not only at our coding bootcamp, but in your career.

From Bootcamp to Bootcamp: Two Military Veterans Discuss Their Transition Into Tech

From Bootcamp to Bootcamp: Jeff Roeder and Benny Fields share their Codeup experience

Are you a veteran or active-duty military member considering your next steps? Our alumni have been in your boots. In a recent virtual panel, two vets discussed their transition into technology careers with Codeup: Benny Fields III, a retired Air Force Master Sergeant turned Full Stack Web Developer, and Jeffery Roeder, a Navy Intelligence Analyst turned Data Scientist. Whether you’re interested in Data Science or Web Development, here are some key takeaways from the event. 

Why Codeup?

“The GI Bill was a huge plus, but the icing on the cake was the placement program.” – Benny Fields

After retiring from the Air Force, Benny Fields took a job as a technical writer, but he quickly became more interested in the software he was writing about than the writing itself. His friend suggested looking into a coding bootcamp, which he did. He liked that Codeup accepts the GI Bill and the icing on the cake for him was learning about the work our student placement team does to get you hired.

What does Codeup’s Student Placement Team do?

“They’ll give you every imaginable tool to get placed. They have tons of connections- it’s crazy. Colleges aren’t gonna do that for you.” – Jeff Roeder

We’ll buff up your resume, set up mock interviews, and give you the know-how to nail your interviews and get a job offer. From how to dress, to what to say in a thank you letter, Jeff said it best: we’ll give you every imaginable tool to get placed in a new career. And it’s backed up by our tuition refund

How did you pass the technical assessments during the application process?

 “They basically tailored their workshop to me. That’s the kinda stuff that Codeup’s gonna do, they’ll get you there!” – Jeff Roeder

Jeff Roeder heard about Data Science classes at Codeup from a friend who had seen our “crazy billboards” (one of which features Benny). He’s a former intelligence analyst, but the admissions process wasn’t entirely a breeze for him. After studying and studying, Python just wasn’t clicking, and he failed one of his technical assessments. He was about to give up on it, but our admissions team wasn’t ready to give up on him. We personally invited him to one of our Saturday workshops where we taught him step by step how to build the foundation he needed. 

How does your military experience relate to your experience at Codeup?

“They were like ‘hey, you’re gonna learn Spanish and you only have six months to do it,’ which is much like going to Codeup to learn something new, you only have six months to do it.” – Jeff Roeder

When Jeff first joined the Navy as a linguist, he was told to learn Spanish in six months. When he joined Codeup, he was told to learn Data Science in five months. They were both immersive experiences where people of different personalities and different cultures joined together for a common goal. As Jeff put it, you may not always like someone or relate to them, but you need each other to accomplish what needs to get done.

“Coming to Codeup, I had to be flexible because I had to learn to adapt to new technologies with new people that were way younger than me and were catching on faster.” – Benny Fields

For Benny, one similarity is that in the Air Force, you have to be flexible. He was used to having a planned day and changing it at the drop of a hat. In the tech field, things are always changing, and flexibility and constant learning are essential. This is where the military flexibility really came in handy for him.

Jeff and Benny may have completed different Codeup programs but they both had the same journey from bootcamp to bootcamp. Both failed their technical assessments at first and had to leverage our resources to get through the admissions process. They both worked with our financial aid team to use their VA benefits for the course, and they both left Codeup with a job and a new skillset.

Mission accomplished.

 

If you’re looking for your next step and want to learn more about using VA benefits to attend Codeup, talk with our team today! And don’t miss our next virtual event – check out our calendar at codeup.com/events!

How to Get Started On Any Programming Exercise

Graphic header for blog "How to start any programing exercise", with photo of Codeup instructor, Ryan Orsinger

Programming is hard. Whether you’re just beginning to learn or you’ve been programming for years, you’re going to run into roadblocks and get stuck. Our Data Science Instructor, Ryan Orsinger, has seen 36 cohorts of students come through Codeup and helped build their problem-solving skills through live, audience-centered lectures. Check out his recipe for success below:

Scenario:

You’re learning to code, learning the syntax for a programming language, and working on thinking programmatically. The lesson or lecture is completed and now you’re now facing a programming problem that is expecting you to understand and apply the new content.

How do you get started?

 

Here’s your algorithm for getting started:

1. With intent, read the curriculum and the code examples.

2. Go back and deliberately read the example code very closely and slowly.

3. Copy any example code into your editor.

    • Identify the pieces of syntax that you recognize.
    • Identify the code for the new concept that you’re working with.
    • Ask yourself how the syntax or concepts you know already support and connect with the new topic or new syntax. Often, the new is relatable in terms of the old.
    • Ask yourself questions about the code example
      • What is this entire code example supposed to do?
      • What piece of the language is this new concept?
      • Is the new code a new piece of syntax? Or is it an existing piece of syntax?

4. Run the example code

5. Observe results. Think about each piece of code. What is it doing, what did you expect it to do?

6. Try modifying the example code so that you change variables to see different results (one at a time…)

If the example code demonstrates how to make a loop from 0 to 9:
– Modify the code to make a loop that starts at 1 and ends at 10.
– Modify the code to make a loop that starts at 10 and counts down to 0.

7. Try removing as many moving pieces from the code for the new concept as possible… try to isolate a unit of work that uses the new concept and test it in isolation

8. Read the first exercise problem. Read it slowly, with attention to detail.

9. Ask yourself questions about the exercise:

  • Can you explain or restate the problem in plain English?
  • Are you able to write down the steps from problem to solution in English, without using any code?
  • Break the exercise down into pieces. Each piece is either something you’ve seen or it’s new.
  • Given the concept for this lesson, identify which part of the exercise uses the new topic
  • For the new piece, what is similar between the exercise code and the example code for the lesson?

10. Work to write code for a smaller problem than the exercise asks.
If the exercise says:
– Prompt the user for a number between 1 and 50
– If the input is not numeric or out of that range, ask them again for a number. Repeat until they give a number between 1 and 50.
– Start by making sure you’re able to prompt a user, then store the result of prompt to a variable for later.
– Go after the low-hanging fruit first. Momentum begets momentum.

11. If you’re still having problems and stuck, go to step 1.

12. If friction, confusion, and “writer’s block” persist, then ask for help from another human being. Explain the steps you’ve already taken, and attempt to ask your question as clearly as possible. Here’s a good resource on how to ask effective questions!

 


Ryan Orsinger is a proud instructor here at Codeup. Check out his personal blog for more insightful information here!

 

 

 


 

If you were inspired by this article and have any questions about our programs, give us a call. We’d love to chat.

The Remote Codeup Student Experience

Codeup Remote Classroom Experience

Communities across Texas have now lived in a remote environment for weeks. While we hoped for good news early on, Governor Abbott’s recent announcement to close schools for the remainder of the school year has confirmed that the new normal amid COVID-19 is remote. A lot of prospective students are left asking: what now? Our answer is simple: little has changed! While we are now conducting class digitally, the rest of the Codeup experience looks the same. Here’s how!

Codeup differs from traditional degrees and online programs because we offer live, full-time, and immersive instruction. Even now, our classes are taught by a team of passionate instructors whose backgrounds range from 20+ years of industry experience to Master Degrees in Adult Education. Each class is led by 2-3 expert instructors and supported by a Teaching Assistant. They deliver live lectures, respond to you in real-time, provide 1:1 support, and individualize your learning to set you up for success. Comparing us to an online boot camp is like comparing a virtual reality experience to a regular TV show. We’re still giving live instruction, we’re just teaching from behind a laptop instead of a podium.

In addition to live instruction, our students enjoy live co-learning. You’re not in this alone! In fact, our cohorts of 20-25 students provide a built-in structure of camaraderie, networking, and technical support. Some of the best learning you can do is by teaching to and learning from other students, a benefit that is lost in attending a part-time or self-paced program.

The combination of live instruction and peer-peer connectivity produces a third benefit: accountability. In this remote world where your couch is your desk, it can be challenging to stay focused and motivated. Our immersive program builds accountability through a daily course schedule, project-based learning, social support, and a helping hand. [Editor’s note: if this weren’t important and learning to code on your own were easy, I’d be writing Java right now instead of a blog post!]

Lastly, the reason Codeup offers a 100% tuition refund guarantee is that we teach directly to the needs of employer partners. Right now, more than ever before, employers need employees who are adaptable and able to work remotely! The remote Codeup experience prepares you to communicate, collaborate, and code remotely, a skill that was already valuable in the tech industry. If anything, you’re getting a little extra bang for your buck by learning a skillset most developers have to earn the hard way.

Although we wish we were on campus high-fiving, writing code, and re-enacting Star Wars lightsabers battles, we’ve realized that’s not really what the Codeup experience is about. The true Codeup experience is about learning to code from experienced professionals alongside passionate students in a live, hands-on environment that offers a 100% tuition refund guarantee. That’s what you can always expect from Codeup, whether we’re remote or not.

If you’ve been affected by COVID-19 in any way (layoffs, health, family, etc.), check out our recently announced COVID-19 Relief Scholarship.

Discovering My Passion Through Codeup

Headshot of WebDevelopment Alumni, Miguel. Beside the title graphic "Discovering my passion through Codeup"

On February 27th, 2020, I completed an intensive career accelerator program to become a Full-Stack Web Developer! It was a great experience that made me feel right at home. Solving problems, planning, and developing projects all aligned perfectly with my passions and hobbies.

 

Out of the 670+ hours spent developing, there were moments when I would feel the stress, frustration, and discouragement when my source code wouldn’t produce my expected outcome. However, I believed in my abilities and persevered. I continued to work diligently on every project until it was successfully complete. The hard work wasn’t easy, but it was extremely rewarding. It is commonly said, “If you love what you do, it won’t feel like work” and I truly what I love to do! I can honestly say that my career is my passion.

 

The impact this program has had on me is unforgettable. I’ve left this program with a new career, knowledge, experience, and skills; but also friends that share the same passion as myself. It was beyond my expectations. I am extremely grateful for the friendships created, the instructors who always had time to help, and the staff that solidified this entire experience. My drive and passion have led me here and I’m eager to embark on this journey to keep learning and continue developing.

 


Are you ready to discover your passion? Then make sure to check out our programs and give us a call, we’d love to help you find the career of your dreams!

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Miguel Garcia is a Software developer in the San Antonio, TX. Connect with him on Linkedin!

Setting Myself Up For Success at Codeup

Blog graphic picturing Codeup Web Development Alumni, next to the title "Setting myself up for success at Codeup"

 

Last year, I knew I needed to make a career change, but I had no idea where to begin. I had fallen into the trap of working mindless jobs only to make ends meet. I was hungry for success and ready to transition from a “job” to a “career,” but I did not know what would get me there. After conducting a lot of research, I came to the conclusion that the tech industry is where I wanted to get started, specifically as a web developer. Unfortunately, when I did a Google search for “coding bootcamp,” I came across about 6,000,000 results. Some programs offered courses online, in-person, or a combination of the two. As for the financial options, programs either offered financial assistance or none at all. I was having a difficult time choosing the best program for me because I was left with so many questions.

 

To find answers to my questions, I decided to schedule calls with the programs I was interested in. After talking to several bootcamps, I was able to narrow down my options. I needed a program located in San Antonio, TX that offered in-person learning and tuition assistance. This was when I knew Codeup was the best possible option for me. I wanted an in-person experience because I needed an environment that would help me find the success I was after. As I did my research on Codeup, it became clear that they were going to provide the best experience for me.

Now that I graduated and am looking back, I know I made the right decision. While I could mention all of the many ways that Codeup changed my life, I want to share some of the benefits for any individuals considering going here. Every day, I was taught by experienced instructors from all types of backgrounds and with various teaching styles. I had an amazing cohort that shared the journey with me and I can confidently say that I have made lifelong friends. I was also surrounded by an amazing network of alumni, staff, employer partners, and the tech community in San Antonio. Everything about Codeup is so much more effective because it is in-person. One of my favorite experiences at Codeup was the career simulation and preparation. I was able to work one-on-one with a professional that is going to help place me in my first web developer position. I feel like none of this success would have been possible if I decided to take an alternate route through an online program or part-time environment

 

Going to school full-time was not an easy task, but here is how I made it possible: 

  • Finances: I saved up enough money to cover my bills while I was in school. I also received a scholarship through Codeup and was awarded a grant through Project QUEST.
  • Time management: I surrounded myself with a team of family and friends that provided me with endless support. They understood that I was going to have late nights and go weeks without seeing them. I planned my days accordingly and always made sure to prioritize school first.
  • Rewards: Throughout my time at Codeup, I found it necessary to give myself little rewards. Whenever I would get through a challenging day or successfully complete a project, I would allow myself a special treat like a Starbucks coffee or a cheap lunch at a restaurant with my cohort. 

 

If you are considering Codeup’s web development program, my advice is that you ask yourself if you are ready to commit to changing your career and ultimately your life in five months. A full-time program is not easy, but the outcome is going to be worth it if you put in hard work. Remember that you are not sacrificing your time, but are instead investing in a better version of you.

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Beverly Jaimes-Puente is a Web Developer in the San Antonio area. Connect with her on Linkedin!

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If you’re ready to find a career you love, we’re happy to help you set yourself up for success too! Give us a call and let’s get started talking about your future, today!

Landing My Dream Job Through A Web Development Course

How I Landed My Dream Job Through A Web Development Course

About a year ago I found myself between jobs, with five years of experience in law enforcement. I was actively applying for law enforcement positions because that was basically all I knew. My mother called me one afternoon and mentioned Codeup. She suggested I apply for the web development course. My first thoughts were, “There’s no way I can become a REAL developer in 18 weeks and, if I get in, I won’t  be able to keep up with the curriculum.” But, there was no risk in applying, so I did. The admissions process was smooth and any questions I had were answered by Codeup staff. Then I was accepted into the web development course!

The course was challenging, but every challenge felt like an opportunity to grow. Each lesson was structured and easy to follow. The instructors give real world examples and encouraged engagement through questions and ideas. The exercises had requirements, but no limits, which allows for multiple solutions and endless possibilities. As the course progressed, I knew this was for me. 

Towards the end of the course, the Codeup staff connected me with potential employers based on what I was looking for. Shortly after completing the course, I received an offer letter from a software company that provides data tracking software to non-profits. 

I love my job. I get to build cool stuff that helps make a difference in the world while growing as a Software Engineer.

My advice for anyone considering Codeup is to reach out to admissions. They would be more than happy to share what Codeup is all about and answer any questions you may have. If you’ve already been accepted, you are in good hands. The staff genuinely wants you to succeed. Try your best and you will do great.

Want to chat with our Admissions Team? Click this link to schedule a time today!

 

 

How To Have A Second Career Start With Codeup

Grow your technical skills for a second career start with Codeup

 

     A lot of students enter Codeup from a previous career. We encounter diverse professionals from teaching, military service, the service industry, music, and more. From those prospective students thinking about a change, we often hear concerns like: “I don’t have any technical skills or background,” “I’m just a teacher,” “I’m only a barista,” “I’m only a hobby computer person”…”I could never be a software developer.”

 

     The good news is YOU, the people with a wide variety of non-software development backgrounds, are our specialty. At Codeup, you’ll leverage the qualities that make you good at what you already do, to excel in a new field.

 

     If you’re thinking about switching careers, you’ve probably already followed a plan: you listened to advice from a guidance counselor, went to college, developed a skill set, landed a job, and grew in your role. But maybe you found the day-to-day wasn’t what you expected, that what you’re good at isn’t good for you, or even that you want to learn and grow more. Maybe you need a second start?

 

     With over 574 alumni, we’ve heard that story a lot. We’ve also seen some surprising trends in common careers before entering Codeup. If you want a change but worry about the leap, check out some of the wide-ranging jobs Codeup grads come from and how their skills made them successful in the tech industry:

 

Teacher/Educator

  • Deep understanding of how to learn and study
  • The ability to understand someone else’s point of view
  • Experience structuring your time, managing a massive workload, and maximize output.
  • How to move yourself and others past learning barriers

 

Server/Barista

  • A work ethic focused on the need of your customers
  • The ability to think outside the box to find a solution
  • Experience working on a team to accomplish something special

 

Musician/Creative

  • Experience learning, reading, and becoming fluent in different non-verbal languages
  • The ability to build something new based on a set of parameters (a key signature, genre, and instrumentation is a lot like a programming language, functionality, and customer)
  • The skill of using your base knowledge to improvise a tune on the fly

 

     One of the biggest misconceptions we hear from prospective students is that they are at a disadvantage coming from a non-technical background. In fact, your background, whatever it is, is an ADVANTAGE in learning a new skill and entering the tech workforce. There are plenty of CS graduates, but there are very few Marine-veteran-musician-digital marketers turned software developers.

     Want to see for yourself? Hear from our students as they share their career stories, and see how far they’ve gone as developers! 

     If you’re looking for a second start and see yourself in any of the above careers or skills, we’d love to help you find your passion. Connect with our Admissions team to learn more.